Posts Tagged ‘engineered wood flooring endlifting’

Cleaning Engineered Wood Floors: Consumer-Caused Delamination

Thursday, July 17th, 2014

The process of layering materials together to form a product is called lamination. Any product made by layering materials together can separate under the right conditions. Engineered wood floors are made by gluing (laminating) several thin plies of wood together to form a board suitable for flooring. By definition, engineered wood is a plied board and can delaminate. That is, any of the layers can separate, including the veneer top sheet.

There is more than one reason why boards delaminate. My job as a flooring inspector is to figure out the exact reason for a flooring failure. Is the cause manufacturing, installation, or site/maintenance related?

Today’s Inspection Safari looks at a maintenance-related cause. (more…)

Engineered Wood Flooring Inspection: Raised Wood End Joints

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

raised wood end joints | Glenn Revere

I have been inspecting flooring complaints for over 40 years. In that time, I have seen all types of problems. Some of them were unavoidable. Most of them were avoidable. Not following a manufacturer’s installation requirements definitely falls into the “avoidable” category.

Installing a wood floor involves many steps, from acclimating the wood prior to installation to cleaning up post-installation. While all wood floors are generally installed in the same way, each manufacturer requires certain installation variations in order to assure a quality installation. These variations are not a secret. Each box of wood contains detailed instructions. If the instructions are missing or something is vague, more information is available on the manufacturer’s website. There is also a toll-free number that one can call for technical support.

So it always amazes me when an “experienced” installer ignores these important requirements and does it “his way.” (more…)