Posts Tagged ‘certified flooring inspector’

How to Find and Hire a Certified Flooring Inspector

Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

I belong to an association of flooring inspection professionals called N.I.C.F.I. or the National Institute of Certified Floorcovering Inspectors. I wanted to pass along some thoughts to you regarding this extraordinary group and its role in the flooring industry.

Like any industry, the people in the overall flooring business range from mediocre to excellent. Within this industry, there are several hundred flooring inspectors. I am here to tell you that the approximately 135 NICFI members are the best in their field.

In order to be a Certified Flooring Inspector, we must first have some type of flooring experience. Then, at our own expense, we are required to take multi-day, out-of-town classes sanctioned by one of several certification bodies and pass tests in whichever area of expertise interests us: carpet, laminate, wood, ceramic tile, resilient, or any combinations. After passing these in-depth tests, (more…)

Laminate Wood Flooring: Weirdest Flooring Inspection Ever!

Thursday, September 11th, 2014

hardwoord flooring box | carpet expert Glenn Revere

I’ve been inspecting flooring for a long time — 40 years! — and I thought I’d seen it all. Or at least, most everything. But this particular inspection really took the cake.

I’d been contacted by a major manufacturer to look at some of their wood flooring. The complaint was “floor falling apart”. There was a note attached that said they couldn’t find any warranty information for this product, sold and installed in 2005. They sent me their inspection form for wood/engineered wood flooring.

I made an appointment with the homeowner to inspect this complaint. When I arrived, I asked to see the “defective” wood floor. Mr. X said, “You are standing on it!” When I looked down, I saw a laminate floor.

Now, a lot of people think a laminate floor is the same thing as a wood floor. But they are made from completely different materials and (more…)

Inspection Safari: Carpet Sprouts – Causes and Solutions

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

carpet yarn sprout | carpet expert Glenn Revere

Last week, I inspected a large commercial installation. The complaint came in as “loose tufts and snags”. What I found was something very different: sprouts.

As defined in my book, All About Carpets, “sprouts are long ends of yarns that protrude above the pile surface…Sprouting is a defect only if excessive and unserviceable.”

When I looked across the large, open, glued-down (no padding) installation, it appeared someone had dropped small ball bearings all over this tufted carpet. What I actually saw were random longer loops of carpet pile that were sticking up above the rest of the level loop pile. So what was going on? Had something yanked loops out of the carpet backing? Or was it something else?

Tufted carpet is made by using needles that stitch carpet yarns into a thin sheet of material. As many as 1,000 needles run across a width of carpet. Each needle sets a looped yarn at a predetermined height. For cut-pile carpet, a knife cuts (more…)

Flooring Inspection Safari: Causes of Dirty Carpet

Tuesday, July 22nd, 2014

soapy carpet spot | carpet expert Glenn Revere

In a previous post, I discussed why a three-year-old carpet stayed clean after its first cleaning, but quickly soiled after its second cleaning. Sometimes, even a brand new carpet starts to “soil up” after just a few weeks. Here’s why.

Carpet mills have to add a detergent-based lubricant to any synthetic fiber (nylon, polyester, or olefin) when they spin it into carpet yarn. Otherwise, the heat from the spinning process could damage the fiber. This is called a spin finish. This lubricant is normally removed during the production process. But mistakes happen. Sometimes the spin finish stays in the carpet instead of getting removed. You can’t see it. When the new carpet is installed in your home, dirt starts to (more…)

Laminate Flooring Inspection: Glueless “Hardwood” Flooring

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

box of glueless hardwood flooring | Glenn Revere

As a Certified Flooring Inspector, I am asked by manufacturers, retailers, installers, and homeowners to inspect all types of flooring. These inspections cover all sorts of complaints: manufacturing related, installation related, site related — even buyer’s remorse. The inspection I’ll share today is “something else.”

A major manufacturer asked me to inspect one of their engineered wood floors. The complaint was “floor falling apart.” That potentially covers a wide range of problems, from bad manufacturing to homeowner abuse.

I scheduled the inspection with the end-user, a retired building contractor. The well maintained home was in (more…)

How to Fix Carpet Holes from Weak Tuft Bind

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

When carpet yarns are tufted into the primary backing, they must be adhered to the backing or they will easily pull out. The tufts are glued to the backing with an adhesive compound using latex rubber as a binder. The general term for this compound is “latex.” Weak tuft bind results from improper application of the latex or a mis-formulation of the latex compound. The latex is applied using a roller the width of the carpet. Once the latex is applied, the carpet goes through an oven to cure the latex. Sometimes the roller that applies the latex to the primary backing puts on too thin a coat or skips an area and doesn’t apply any at all. Eventually, the tufts in these weak areas work loose and holes appear in the face of the carpet. (more…)

Know the Difference Between Wood Flooring Types

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

photo of wood flooring

Before I became a Certified Flooring Inspector, I did not realize that there are two types of wood flooring: solid wood and engineered wood floors. (Laminate is a hard surface type of flooring, but is not considered wood.)

Both types of wood flooring have certain things in common. Both can only be installed in an enclosed, temperature controlled environment. While wood flooring is not a living thing, it is (more…)

Carpet Defects: All About Carpet Cornrowing

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

With cornrowing, cut pile carpet lays down in irregular rows 1⁄2 to 2 inches apart. This is a severe type of texture change. Most people think it is ugly. Cornrowing always runs across the traffic flow, but it even happens in little-used rooms that are only vacuumed. You’ll sometimes see it when a door drags across the carpet pile. It usually happens with longer piles, more than 5⁄8 inch, and softer, fine denier yarns, especially low-density carpets with low gauge and stitch rates.

Despite years of research and testing, no one has figured out why some carpets cornrow and others don’t. It is generally agreed that because (more…)

Carpet Problems: Carpet Sprouts and Snags

Thursday, March 6th, 2014

carpet yarn sprout | carpet expert Glenn Revere

Carpet sprouts and snags are tufts that have worked themselves up so that they are higher than the surrounding pile.

Snags are face yarns, cut or loop, that have been pulled from the backing by something in the home. Snags are more common with loop piles. Vacuum cleaners with sharp corners or broken parts, pets, protruding nails from shoe heels, chair legs, and children can all pull out tufts and cause snags. Single snags should be clipped flush with (more…)

Carpet Inspection Safari: Cause of Loose Carpet Yarns?

Thursday, December 12th, 2013

loose carpet yarns | Glenn Revere, Carpet Expert

I recently looked at a new carpet installed throughout a two-story, four-bedroom home, where the owner had complained she found loose tufts (carpet yarns) all over the house after she vacuumed. She had saved several dozen tufts for me to look at.

There are several reasons why loose tufts appear on a carpet. The causes could be manufacturing, installation, or in-home related. My job as a flooring inspector is to eliminate possibilities and discover the true reason for this complaint.

The owner has a cat. The loose tufts were in good condition — they did not look like the cat had clawed them. I used an ultraviolet light to check for cat urine: negative. I did not smell any urine, either.

I checked the new vacuum. Broken parts or (more…)