Posts Tagged ‘carpet yarn’

Flooring Inspection Safari: Causes of Dirty Carpet

Tuesday, July 22nd, 2014

soapy carpet spot | carpet expert Glenn Revere

In a previous post, I discussed why a three-year-old carpet stayed clean after its first cleaning, but quickly soiled after its second cleaning. Sometimes, even a brand new carpet starts to “soil up” after just a few weeks. Here’s why.

Carpet mills have to add a detergent-based lubricant to any synthetic fiber (nylon, polyester, or olefin) when they spin it into carpet yarn. Otherwise, the heat from the spinning process could damage the fiber. This is called a spin finish. This lubricant is normally removed during the production process. But mistakes happen. Sometimes the spin finish stays in the carpet instead of getting removed. You can’t see it. When the new carpet is installed in your home, dirt starts to (more…)

Carpet Defects: All About Carpet Cornrowing

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

With cornrowing, cut pile carpet lays down in irregular rows 1⁄2 to 2 inches apart. This is a severe type of texture change. Most people think it is ugly. Cornrowing always runs across the traffic flow, but it even happens in little-used rooms that are only vacuumed. You’ll sometimes see it when a door drags across the carpet pile. It usually happens with longer piles, more than 5⁄8 inch, and softer, fine denier yarns, especially low-density carpets with low gauge and stitch rates.

Despite years of research and testing, no one has figured out why some carpets cornrow and others don’t. It is generally agreed that because (more…)

Carpet Problems: Carpet Sprouts and Snags

Thursday, March 6th, 2014

carpet yarn sprout | carpet expert Glenn Revere

Carpet sprouts and snags are tufts that have worked themselves up so that they are higher than the surrounding pile.

Snags are face yarns, cut or loop, that have been pulled from the backing by something in the home. Snags are more common with loop piles. Vacuum cleaners with sharp corners or broken parts, pets, protruding nails from shoe heels, chair legs, and children can all pull out tufts and cause snags. Single snags should be clipped flush with (more…)