Posts Tagged ‘carpet inspection’

How to Find and Hire a Certified Flooring Inspector

Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

I belong to an association of flooring inspection professionals called N.I.C.F.I. or the National Institute of Certified Floorcovering Inspectors. I wanted to pass along some thoughts to you regarding this extraordinary group and its role in the flooring industry.

Like any industry, the people in the overall flooring business range from mediocre to excellent. Within this industry, there are several hundred flooring inspectors. I am here to tell you that the approximately 135 NICFI members are the best in their field.

In order to be a Certified Flooring Inspector, we must first have some type of flooring experience. Then, at our own expense, we are required to take multi-day, out-of-town classes sanctioned by one of several certification bodies and pass tests in whichever area of expertise interests us: carpet, laminate, wood, ceramic tile, resilient, or any combinations. After passing these in-depth tests, (more…)

Carpet Problems and Solutions: Carpet High Lines

Thursday, October 2nd, 2014

carpet high lines | Glenn Revere

Carpeting is made using one of two methods: tufting or weaving. Almost all of the residential carpet sold today is made by tufting. Tufting machines are basically giant sewing machines. Instead of a single needle, 800-1,000 computer controlled needles stitch carpet yarns across a backing material to form the carpet. The needles are set to control the height of the carpet pile. Sometimes a single needle stitches a row of yarn that is too long. Cut pile carpets are carefully sheared after tufting in order to assure a smooth, even pile surface. Even so, a high row or high line can show up after a carpet is installed. If the high row is bent over and buried in the carpet pile, the line may take days or weeks to appear after the carpet has been repeatedly vacuumed. Tufting high lines always run lengthwise. (more…)

Inspection Safari: Carpet Sprouts – Causes and Solutions

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

carpet yarn sprout | carpet expert Glenn Revere

Last week, I inspected a large commercial installation. The complaint came in as “loose tufts and snags”. What I found was something very different: sprouts.

As defined in my book, All About Carpets, “sprouts are long ends of yarns that protrude above the pile surface…Sprouting is a defect only if excessive and unserviceable.”

When I looked across the large, open, glued-down (no padding) installation, it appeared someone had dropped small ball bearings all over this tufted carpet. What I actually saw were random longer loops of carpet pile that were sticking up above the rest of the level loop pile. So what was going on? Had something yanked loops out of the carpet backing? Or was it something else?

Tufted carpet is made by using needles that stitch carpet yarns into a thin sheet of material. As many as 1,000 needles run across a width of carpet. Each needle sets a looped yarn at a predetermined height. For cut-pile carpet, a knife cuts (more…)

Carpet Discoloration: Heat Damaged Carpet Seams

Tuesday, August 26th, 2014

discolored carpet seam | Glenn Revere

Making tufted carpet is complicated. Several steps in the process use heat. Some of those steps include twisting yarn, dyeing yarn, and curing the carpet backings. So heat and carpet is a good combination, right? Well, not always.

Heat can also damage carpet, as today’s Flooring Inspection Safari illustrates:

A high quality nylon carpet was installed in a second story condo. Approximately 18-24 months after the installation, the renter noticed the carpet was fading from tan to pink along the seams! The carpet had not been cleaned yet. The renter, acting on the owner’s behalf, turned in a claim. I was asked to inspect the job for the manufacturer. As always, I looked at the overall installation to make sure it mets industry quality standards. I have duplicated the main portion of my inspection report here. It explains my findings: (more…)

Flooring Inspection Safari: Knee Kicker Carpet Tears

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014

knee kicker tear | Carpet Expert Glenn Revere

Knee Kicker: a short device with gripper teeth on one end and a cushion on the other. It is used by installers to stretch carpet in small areas, like closets. It is also used to position the carpet onto the tackless strip before power stretching. The installer puts the teeth into the pile and bumps the padded end with the area just above the knee. (From All About Carpets: Everything You Need to Know)

After installing a new carpet, it is normal to see an occasional loose tuft or thread here and there. It is not normal to still see loose tufts coming out of the new carpet after a few weeks.

There are several reasons for tufts (carpet yarns) to work out of the carpet backing. There might be a problem with (more…)

Widthwise Lines in Carpet: Shift Marks

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

photo of carpet shift marks | Glenn Revere

Beautiful carpeting is made on very complicated machinery. When more parts make up a machine, more things can go wrong with the manufacturing process. The carpet mills know this. They have extensive inspection and quality control departments whose function is to find defective carpet and keep it from arriving at your home. In spite of these controls, mistakes happen.

Carpeting can contain various types of streaks, either lengthwise or widthwise in direction. There are many causes for these streaks. I recently looked at some carpet that had widthwise lines/streaks throughout the installation. The complaint for this newly installed carpet was listed as “uneven dye.” It was not noticed until the day after installation. I was asked by the mill to determine the cause of this problem. I arrived at my conclusion by using a process of elimination. (more…)

Flooring Inspection Safari: Latent Defects in Carpet

Thursday, May 8th, 2014

fuzzy carpet loops | Glenn Revere

Any manufactured product can have defects. Carpeting is no different. When carpeting comes off the final product line, it goes through an inspection process. The most glaring, obvious defects are caught during this mill inspection.

Once the carpet is delivered to your home for installation, your installer is the next line of defense against defects. It is the installer’s responsibility to examine the carpet for defects after it is unrolled. If he/she sees a problem, the installation is stopped until the nature of the defect is determined. Some defects can be corrected. Sometimes the carpet must be replaced. (more…)

Common Carpet Complaints: Side Match (Uneven Carpet Color)

Thursday, May 1st, 2014

side match | Glenn Revere

One of the more common complaints that carpet inspectors see is something called “side match”. This is a condition where the carpet color along a seam is darker on one side of the seam and lighter along the other side of the seam. There are several reasons why the color doesn’t “match” at a seam. The reasons are installation, manufacturing, or site related.

Today’s Inspection Safari involves a carpet installation in a Great room — a large, isolated room with a single seam near the center of the room. There is an obvious difference in color between the two pieces of carpet, one 13 feet wide and the other 8 feet wide, that are joined by the seam. The question is: what is causing this color difference?! (more…)

Flooring Inspection Safari: Bubbled and Wrinkled Carpet Backing

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

wrinkled carpet backing | Glenn Revere

Recently, I received an inspection request from a major carpet manufacturer. The complaint involved carpet yarns pulling from the carpet backing.

The carpet was installed throughout a large, well-maintained two-story home. The consumer explained to me that she had found carpet yarns pulled from the backing throughout the installation. She acknowledged that she has a dog and two cats. But she was adamant that her pets had not damaged the carpet.

The carpet texture was a cut and loop pattern. The pattern formed a small grid. When I looked around the rooms, I noticed that (more…)

Carpet Buying: Is There a “Footprint Free” Carpet?

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

footprint free carpet | carpet expert Glenn Revere

What happens when you pay for a horse but get a mule? Or in this case, you thought you bought a “footprint free” carpet but as soon as it was installed you knew you had been taken?

I was recently hired by a woman who was in this situation. She explained that she had asked her salesperson for a carpet that doesn’t show footprints. The salesperson showed her a sample of a carpet that the salesperson said would not show footprints or traffic patterns. My client bought the carpet. The day it was installed she saw that it certainly showed footprints. She called the store the next day. The store had just gone out of business! The doors were closed!

My client spent months tracking down the store owner. She finally found him. He arranged for the carpet mill to send an inspector to (more…)