Posts Tagged ‘carpet buying guide’

Carpet Buying: Is it Smart to Buy Carpet Online?

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

Q: Is it smart to buy carpet online?

If you know how to properly measure your rooms, you know exactly what you want to buy, and you have your own carpet installer in mind, then buying carpet online can save you a lot of money.

But, before you go this route, it’s important to keep the following considerations in mind:

  • In order to determine how much carpet you need to buy, you’ll need to determine the square footage of the rooms you’re carpeting, and then factor in the width of the carpet roll you’re interested in (they’re not all the same size). You’ll also need to consider how much extra carpet you may need in order to line up patterns, etc. It’s important to do all of these calculations properly up front, since you won’t necessarily be able to run to the store to buy extra if you come up short.
  • Most online retailers require that you sign a disclosure that makes you responsible for assessing and reporting any damage (from the manufacturer or the shipper) before accepting your carpet when it’s delivered. That means, you’ll need (more…)

Carpet Buying Guide: All About Triexta Carpet

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

The Triexta carpet fiber took almost twenty years to develop specifically as a carpet fiber. While related to polyester, the Federal Trade Commission recognized it as a unique fiber in 2009. Mohawk markets Triexta fiber under their SmartStrand brand.

Triexta fiber has become very popular in the last few years. It is very stain and fade resistant. It cleans well. It is available in a huge range of colors and styles. And it is as resilient as nylon fiber while generally lower priced. It does have an affinity for oily spills. These spills tend to wick and re-appear if they are not carefully cleaned. (more…)

Carpet Buying Guide: All About Polyester Carpet

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

Polyester carpet (PET) has a great “green” story. Most of the polyester used in carpets is made from recycled bottles. In fact, billions of bottles each year are diverted from landfills, melted, and turned into carpet fiber!

Polyester fiber is dyed while still in a melted state. Called solution dyeing, this process puts the color in the molecular structure of the fiber. Solution dyed fibers are extremely colorfast even in strong sunlight. This fiber is very stain resistant to almost all household spills. It also cleans well. Static is non-existent. Generally, polyester carpet costs less than nylon carpet.

Polyester carpet fiber has a few drawbacks. It does not have the same resilience as nylon. Once badly crushed, it will not “bounce back” like nylon. Furniture marks are much more difficult to remove. Polyester carpets must be made in heavier weights to perform as well as nylon carpet. While water based spills come right out, oil based spills are more difficult to remove. Oily spills tend to reappear and could take several re-cleanings to completely remove the spill.

To learn more about carpet fibers, read the following blog post: Carpet Buying Guide: Know the Difference Between Carpet Fibers.

To learn more about carpet buying, carpet care, carpet styles, carpet warranties and more, please subscribe to this blog and check out my book, All About Carpets: Everything You Need to Know.

Who is Glenn Revere?

Glenn Revere has been a carpet expert since 1973. He’s a certified flooring inspector and the author of All About Carpets, the only book written to protect and inform you about your carpet choices, from carpet buying and carpet warranties to carpet care and maintenance. You can find him on Facebook, Google+ and Twitter.

Carpet Buying Guide: All About Nylon Carpet

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

Chemists have formulated synthetic carpet fibers from petroleum for decades. Some of these synthetics did not work well. Nylon was the first commercially successful synthetic carpet fiber. It wore extremely well.

But earlier generations of nylon fiber also stained badly. Chemists spent years figuring out how to make nylon fiber more stain resistant. Stainmaster brand nylon hit the market in the late ’80’s and changed the carpet industry. Suddenly you could put light colors of carpet in heavily used rooms and maintain it much more easily.

Today, virtually all synthetic fibers are stain resistant. (Note: none of these fibers claims to be stain proof). The trend is towards ultra soft fibers. (more…)

Carpet vs Wood Flooring: 6 Deciding Factors

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

50/50 photo of carpet and wood flooring

So you’ve decided to finally replace the floors in your home. Congratulations! Now, how do you decide if you want carpet, wood, or some of each? Both types of flooring have their pros and cons.

First, you have to understand the differences between solid wood and engineered wood flooring. (Laminate is a completely different type of floor.)

Solid wood is, as its name implies, a solid piece of one species of wood cut from a tree, usually 3/4” thick and 2”- 3” wide. It has been used in homes as flooring for hundreds of years. It is most often stained and sealed after it is installed in your home.

Engineered wood is a piece of plywood with (more…)

Carpet Buying Guide: All About Wool Carpet

Tuesday, March 25th, 2014

sheep

Wool, used in rugs for centuries, is the only natural fiber used in wall to wall carpeting today. The sheep whose wool is used for carpet fiber are special breeds. The characteristics of their wool are different than wool used in clothing. Wool is scarce and therefore expensive. Many retailers don’t show wool carpet samples because it is beyond the budget for many people. It is common to see wool blended with other fibers, such as nylon or acrylic. This way, you still get the characteristics of a wool carpet but (more…)

Carpet Buying Guide: Know the Difference Between Carpet Fibers

Thursday, March 20th, 2014

wool carpet

As everyone knows, there is a lot to talk about when it comes to carpeting: usage, fibers, styles, patterns, etc.

Carpeting is used everywhere we live and work. You’ll find it in most homes, from the most basic cottage to glamorous homes regularly used to entertain many guests. You also see carpet throughout high-rise office buildings, convention centers, airports, and other large commercial installations. This article will focus on residential carpeting. Commercial applications are a separate story.

Carpeting brings quiet and warmth to any setting. Because it is an absorptive fabric, carpet reduces sound levels and makes a noisy room more quiet. Carpet also acts as insulation. It helps keep rooms warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer. So carpeted floors are good in any climate. (more…)