Posts Tagged ‘all about carpets’

Carpet Care: How Often Should I Vacuum?

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

I often get asked by clients and friends: How often should I vacuum? Well, here’s the answer.

It is recommended that under average household conditions (four people, one pet), a carpet should be vacuumed at least twice a week — once lightly, once thoroughly.

A light vacuuming means two to three forward and back overlapping passes of the machine in each of the high-traffic areas, with one pass in the low traffic areas.

Regular vacuuming is probably the single most helpful thing a person can do to (more…)

Inspection Safari: Carpet Sprouts – Causes and Solutions

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

carpet yarn sprout | carpet expert Glenn Revere

Last week, I inspected a large commercial installation. The complaint came in as “loose tufts and snags”. What I found was something very different: sprouts.

As defined in my book, All About Carpets, “sprouts are long ends of yarns that protrude above the pile surface…Sprouting is a defect only if excessive and unserviceable.”

When I looked across the large, open, glued-down (no padding) installation, it appeared someone had dropped small ball bearings all over this tufted carpet. What I actually saw were random longer loops of carpet pile that were sticking up above the rest of the level loop pile. So what was going on? Had something yanked loops out of the carpet backing? Or was it something else?

Tufted carpet is made by using needles that stitch carpet yarns into a thin sheet of material. As many as 1,000 needles run across a width of carpet. Each needle sets a looped yarn at a predetermined height. For cut-pile carpet, a knife cuts (more…)

The Importance of Proper Carpet Care

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

carpet vacuum

What can you do to keep your beautiful and expensive carpet looking showroom new? Plan to care for your carpet in a number of ways involving both short- and long-term maintenance.

In the short term, regular vacuuming and spotting works wonders to keep the carpet looking good. Over the long term, plan on (and budget for) regular professional cleaning to maintain your investment.

Most carpet warranties require periodic professional (more…)

Flooring Inspection Safari: Knee Kicker Carpet Tears

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014

knee kicker tear | Carpet Expert Glenn Revere

Knee Kicker: a short device with gripper teeth on one end and a cushion on the other. It is used by installers to stretch carpet in small areas, like closets. It is also used to position the carpet onto the tackless strip before power stretching. The installer puts the teeth into the pile and bumps the padded end with the area just above the knee. (From All About Carpets: Everything You Need to Know)

After installing a new carpet, it is normal to see an occasional loose tuft or thread here and there. It is not normal to still see loose tufts coming out of the new carpet after a few weeks.

There are several reasons for tufts (carpet yarns) to work out of the carpet backing. There might be a problem with (more…)

Carpet 411: All About Tufted Carpet

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

tufted carpet | carpet expert Glenn Revere

As I mentioned in my recent post on woven carpet, which only accounts for 2% of the carpets sold today, the majority of the carpets being purchased for residential homes is called tufted carpet.

Tufted carpet is manufactured using a giant sewing machine with as many as 1,200 needles. The spacing of the needles is one factor in determining the quality of the carpet, since the closer the needles, the tighter the yarn spacing stitched into the carpet backing and the heavier the fabric. But, this is just one factor.

These tufting machines are (more…)

Carpet 411: All About Woven Carpet

Thursday, June 19th, 2014

woven carpet

Selecting a woven carpet for your home is a high-quality investment. But, because of cost, they only account for roughly 2% of the carpets installed in most residential homes.

The majority of woven carpets are made by machines nowadays. With the advent of machine-powered looms came more intricate colors and patterns, not previously possible with hand looms. So, consumers are now able to enjoy an (more…)

Flooring Inspection Safari: Bubbled and Wrinkled Carpet Backing

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

wrinkled carpet backing | Glenn Revere

Recently, I received an inspection request from a major carpet manufacturer. The complaint involved carpet yarns pulling from the carpet backing.

The carpet was installed throughout a large, well-maintained two-story home. The consumer explained to me that she had found carpet yarns pulled from the backing throughout the installation. She acknowledged that she has a dog and two cats. But she was adamant that her pets had not damaged the carpet.

The carpet texture was a cut and loop pattern. The pattern formed a small grid. When I looked around the rooms, I noticed that (more…)

Carpet Problems: All About Carpet Pile Reversal

Tuesday, February 18th, 2014

As discussed in a recent blog post, carpet shading is an apparent color difference between areas of the same carpet. Shading is seen all over a cut pile carpet. Pile reversal or reverse pile is an extreme form of shading with the pile yarns laying on their sides, causing the carpet to look darker in the affected areas. You see it mostly in high-traffic areas (think hallways) or at pivot points (like doorways). Pile reversal is similar to crushed-velvet furniture fabrics, with light and dark shades.

Some people think shading and pile reversal are ugly because the color is uneven. Others consider it the mark of a fine quality carpet. Oriental rugs often have shading or pile reversal. But the rugs’ ornate patterns tend to make these conditions less noticeable. At any rate, mills will not replace a carpet for pile reversal because they know the replacement will probably reverse, too. (more…)

Carpet Tips: What’s the Best Living Room Carpet?

Thursday, February 13th, 2014

frieze carpet | carpet expert Glenn Revere

Q: What type of carpet is best for high-traffic areas, like living rooms and hallways?

The family room, halls, and steps are the main traffic areas in any home. It makes sense to put the sturdiest carpet and pad in these areas. The investment is well worth it. A heavy frieze, tightly twisted short cut-pile, or Berber will hold up under a lot of traffic. And remember, when a carpet (more…)

Carpet Problems: All About Carpet Shading

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

carpet shading

Carpet shading is an apparent color difference between areas of the same carpet. It is a common complaint with cut pile carpets. The industry considers it a “normal characteristic of cut pile fabrics.” Shading ranges in intensity from slight to severe. It is caused by the face yarns changing the direction of their lay. Footprints and vacuum wheel marks are two types of shading, caused when the yarns are crushed down.

You also sometimes see shading along a seam. One side looks lighter than the other when you enter a room. Then when you walk to the other end of the room and look back, it (more…)