Archive for the ‘Carpet Problems & Solutions’ Category

Common Carpet Defects: Carpet Oil Streaks

Tuesday, May 13th, 2014

All kinds of lines appear in carpets. You can see some as soon as the carpet is rolled out; some don’t show up for several days or weeks. Some run lengthwise, others widthwise. Some can be removed, others can’t. Below is information on carpet oil streaks. I also suggest you read my previous posts on high lines and low lines in carpet, shear streaks, stop marks and shift marks.

Any mechanical equipment needs lubrication. Carpet tufters are complicated machines, with hundreds of moving parts that must be oiled. Machine oils from various places in the production line can get on the carpet pile. Part of the finishing process for broadloom carpets involves scouring and washing to remove contaminants. Still, because the oil is clear, (more…)

Flooring Inspection Safari: Latent Defects in Carpet

Thursday, May 8th, 2014

fuzzy carpet loops | Glenn Revere

Any manufactured product can have defects. Carpeting is no different. When carpeting comes off the final product line, it goes through an inspection process. The most glaring, obvious defects are caught during this mill inspection.

Once the carpet is delivered to your home for installation, your installer is the next line of defense against defects. It is the installer’s responsibility to examine the carpet for defects after it is unrolled. If he/she sees a problem, the installation is stopped until the nature of the defect is determined. Some defects can be corrected. Sometimes the carpet must be replaced. (more…)

Common Carpet Defects: Carpet Shift Marks

Tuesday, May 6th, 2014

All kinds of lines appear in carpets. You can see some as soon as the carpet is rolled out; some don’t show up for several days or weeks. Some run lengthwise, others widthwise. Some can be removed, others can’t. Below is information on carpet shift marks. Future blogs will cover other common line flaw types, such as oil streaks and pattern bowing. I also suggest you read my previous posts on high lines and low lines in carpet, shear streaks and stop marks.

Carpets are tufted with either straight rows or zig-zag rows. Zig-zag rows are made using a step-over stitch. When the tension of the tufting equipment is set too tightly, the carpet is made with too (more…)

Common Carpet Complaints: Side Match (Uneven Carpet Color)

Thursday, May 1st, 2014

side match | Glenn Revere

One of the more common complaints that carpet inspectors see is something called “side match”. This is a condition where the carpet color along a seam is darker on one side of the seam and lighter along the other side of the seam. There are several reasons why the color doesn’t “match” at a seam. The reasons are installation, manufacturing, or site related.

Today’s Inspection Safari involves a carpet installation in a Great room — a large, isolated room with a single seam near the center of the room. There is an obvious difference in color between the two pieces of carpet, one 13 feet wide and the other 8 feet wide, that are joined by the seam. The question is: what is causing this color difference?! (more…)

Common Carpet Defects: Carpet Stop Marks

Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

All kinds of lines appear in carpets. You can see some as soon as the carpet is rolled out; some don’t show up for several days or weeks. Some run lengthwise, others widthwise. Some can be removed, others can’t. Below is information on carpet stop marks. Future blogs will cover other common line flaw types, such as shift marks, oil streaks and pattern bowing. I also suggest you read my previous posts on high lines and low lines in carpet and shear streaks.

Carpet stop marks look like widthwise rows of missing yarn. (more…)

Common Carpet Defects: Carpet Shear Streaks

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

All kinds of lines appear in carpets. You can see some as soon as the carpet is rolled out; some don’t show up for several days or weeks. Some run lengthwise, others widthwise. Some can be removed, others can’t. Below is information on carpet shear streaks. Future blogs will cover other common line flaw types, such as stop marks, shift marks, oil streaks and pattern bowing. I also suggest you read my previous post on high lines and low lines in carpet.

You will see shear streaks when a tufting machine’s shearing blades malfunction. The blades can jump up when the machine stops or starts suddenly. Then you’ll see a (more…)

How to Seam Carpet and Why Carpet Seaming is Important

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

carpet seam sealing | Glenn Revere

Installing carpet correctly is not an easy job. There is more to it than “fuzzy side up”! An installer can spend years learning about the finer points of his (or her) craft. One key point that is frequently skipped completely is carpet seaming. “What is that?” you might ask.

Carpet is a fabric that is cut off a long roll and then cut again as needed to fit a room or rooms. Unless the rooms are slightly smaller than width of the carpet, the pieces must be seamed (joined) together into larger pieces to fit the rooms to be carpeted. (more…)

Common Carpet Defects: High Lines and Low Lines in Carpet

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

All kinds of lines appear in carpets. You can see some as soon as the carpet is rolled out; some don’t show up for several days or weeks. Some run lengthwise, others widthwise. Some can be removed, others can’t. Below is information on high lines and low lines in carpet. Future blogs will cover other common line flaw types, such as shear streaks, stop marks, shift marks, oil streaks and pattern bowing.

Lengthwise high lines or high rows in tufted cut pile carpets show up for a couple of different reasons. Carpets are sheared during the finishing process to produce an even pile height and texture. The shearing blades are like a reel lawn mower that runs the width of the carpet. If the blades are nicked, the carpet pile running under the damaged area comes out higher than the rest of the pile. Improperly set tufting needles can insert a row or rows of yarn that are too long. This happens with both cut and loop patterns. Sometimes the final shearing for cut piles misses these high rows. Loop carpets aren’t sheared, so the high rows stay in the roll until inspection. (more…)

Carpet Problems: All About Carpet Buckling and Wrinkling

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

Carpet buckling occurs when a carpet loses its stretch and wrinkles develop. It can happen because of poor latexing, improper stretching, a soft pad, excess humidity, improper cleaning, or rolling furniture or equipment. Puckers around doorways and wrinkles in the traffic areas are sure signs of buckling.

Poor Latexing

Just as poor latexing leads to weak tuft bind, it can cause a carpet to lose its stretch. Brittle, powdery, or thin latex will make a carpet too flexible and make it impossible to lay tight. If the latex application is not strong enough to bind the primary and secondary backings together, the carpet delaminates. Air gets trapped between the two layers and you’ll see bubbles and buckles. When this happens along a seam, the seam opens up. You can stick your fingers between the two backings. When it happens in the center of the room, the carpet will bunch up when you vacuum. You can easily lift the carpet several inches from the floor. (more…)

Faded Carpet Color Causes + My Carpet Turned Pink!

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

When you buy a new carpet, you probably select the color carefully. But you probably don’t give much thought about the color fading.

The most obvious reason for color fading is sunlight. Even with special protection on your windows, ultraviolet wavelengths, part of the makeup of daylight, are destructive to all sorts of materials: plastic, paint, rubber, and, yes, the pigments that make the beautiful color in your new carpet. Sometimes the color slowly fades over all the carpet. Sometimes you might see a greenish strip along the base of a sliding door.

Sometimes a carpet’s fading has nothing to do with ultraviolet light. There are other factors that can break down carpet dye and give your carpet a whole new, although unwanted, appearance. These factors include ozone fading and (natural) gas fading.

I recently inspected carpeting in two homes that exhibited the same problem: the carpets were fading from a sand/beige color to pink! (more…)