Archive for the ‘Carpet Care’ Category

Carpet Care: How to Remove Halloween Carpet Stains

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

 

halloween pumpkins

I thought it’d be seasonally appropriate to provide some how-to help on removing Halloween carpet stains (e.g. fake blood, hard candy, makeup and more).

Here are some articles I found to help you keep your carpets clean this Halloween!

How to Remove Hard Candy from Carpet

How to Remove Candy, Makeup and Chocolate from Carpet

How to Clean Carpet Stains: Fake Blood, Pumpkin, Candle Wax and More

I hope you have a safe and festive holiday…and that you’re able to keep your carpets clean. (more…)

How to Find the Best Vacuum Cleaner

Tuesday, September 30th, 2014

There are a lot of variables to selecting the “right” vacuum. You can’t buy a vacuum based on price alone. So, how do you find a vacuum that works well with your carpet?

The independent Carpet and Rug Institute tests all types of vacuums. The CRI does not accept money from vacuum manufacturers. Their only aim is to independently help you find the correct vacuum for your needs. You can go to their home page at www.carpet-rug.org. Then click on Residential Customers, then Cleaning and Maintenance, then Seal of Approval Products, and select Vacuums. The Institute has a long list of approved, efficient machines with links to the manufacturers’ websites.

In general, the Institute has found that upright vacuums outperform tank-type or canisters, even when (more…)

Carpet Care: Is It Possible to Vacuum Too Much?

Thursday, September 25th, 2014

Q: Is it possible to vacuum too much?

Answer: I’m often asked if a carpet can be vacuumed too much. Today’s synthetic fabrics are made to be vacuumed. Many maintain their appearance only by vacuuming. Normally, most vacuums work well with most kinds of fabrics, but some heavy duty machines teamed with delicate fibers such as wool or soft, fine nylon can cause problems. Strong motors and stiff brushes can distort cut-pile patterns and make Berber-type looped fabrics look fuzzy or stringy. A vacuum brush that is soft to medium in stiffness is the safest for most carpets. If your vacuum has adjustable brushes, it is also better to set the brushes higher rather than lower. You should feel little resistance against the carpet when you vacuum. Some manufacturers suggest that it is better for the brushes to barely touch the pile. This prevents you from beating the carpet to death. (more…)

Carpet Care: How Often Should I Vacuum?

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

I often get asked by clients and friends: How often should I vacuum? Well, here’s the answer.

It is recommended that under average household conditions (four people, one pet), a carpet should be vacuumed at least twice a week — once lightly, once thoroughly.

A light vacuuming means two to three forward and back overlapping passes of the machine in each of the high-traffic areas, with one pass in the low traffic areas.

Regular vacuuming is probably the single most helpful thing a person can do to (more…)

The Importance of Proper Carpet Care

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

carpet vacuum

What can you do to keep your beautiful and expensive carpet looking showroom new? Plan to care for your carpet in a number of ways involving both short- and long-term maintenance.

In the short term, regular vacuuming and spotting works wonders to keep the carpet looking good. Over the long term, plan on (and budget for) regular professional cleaning to maintain your investment.

Most carpet warranties require periodic professional (more…)

Flooring Inspection Safari: Causes of Dirty Carpet

Tuesday, July 22nd, 2014

soapy carpet spot | carpet expert Glenn Revere

In a previous post, I discussed why a three-year-old carpet stayed clean after its first cleaning, but quickly soiled after its second cleaning. Sometimes, even a brand new carpet starts to “soil up” after just a few weeks. Here’s why.

Carpet mills have to add a detergent-based lubricant to any synthetic fiber (nylon, polyester, or olefin) when they spin it into carpet yarn. Otherwise, the heat from the spinning process could damage the fiber. This is called a spin finish. This lubricant is normally removed during the production process. But mistakes happen. Sometimes the spin finish stays in the carpet instead of getting removed. You can’t see it. When the new carpet is installed in your home, dirt starts to (more…)

Flooring Inspection Safari: Proper Carpet Cleaning

Tuesday, July 8th, 2014

carpet cleaning | carpet expert Glenn Revere

I received an inspection request from a carpet manufacturer. The carpet had been installed for 3 1/2 years. It had been cleaned twice. The complaint was: “carpet looks terrible, appears soiled after cleaning.” My job was to see how the carpet was holding up and to check the soil/stain resistance of the fiber.

When I arrived at the well-maintained home, I saw that the main floor was ceramic tile. The carpet in question was installed on the stairs, and in the upstairs hallway and connecting master bedroom.

The last carpet cleaning had been done (more…)

All About Carpet Stains: Oxidizing Agents & Reducing Agents

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

A stain is a spot that won’t come out of a carpet. A stain is caused by either adding color to an area of the carpet (with reducing agents) or by removing color from an area of the carpet (with oxidizing agents). Carpet warranties for stain-resistant carpet fibers are very specific regarding which types of stains are covered under the warranty and which types are not covered. Read your warranty carefully.

Everyone knows that if you spill bleach on a carpet, the color lightens and fades. Bleach, an oxidizing agent, is a color remover. Many other common household items also destroy color. Disinfectants, fade creams, pesticides, toilet and tile cleaners, drain cleaner, oven cleaner, plant food, perfumes, and acne medicines all make stains by removing color from the carpet. (more…)

Carpet Problems: All About Carpet Buckling and Wrinkling

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

Carpet buckling occurs when a carpet loses its stretch and wrinkles develop. It can happen because of poor latexing, improper stretching, a soft pad, excess humidity, improper cleaning, or rolling furniture or equipment. Puckers around doorways and wrinkles in the traffic areas are sure signs of buckling.

Poor Latexing

Just as poor latexing leads to weak tuft bind, it can cause a carpet to lose its stretch. Brittle, powdery, or thin latex will make a carpet too flexible and make it impossible to lay tight. If the latex application is not strong enough to bind the primary and secondary backings together, the carpet delaminates. Air gets trapped between the two layers and you’ll see bubbles and buckles. When this happens along a seam, the seam opens up. You can stick your fingers between the two backings. When it happens in the center of the room, the carpet will bunch up when you vacuum. You can easily lift the carpet several inches from the floor. (more…)

Carpet Problems: All About Carpet Shading

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

carpet shading

Carpet shading is an apparent color difference between areas of the same carpet. It is a common complaint with cut pile carpets. The industry considers it a “normal characteristic of cut pile fabrics.” Shading ranges in intensity from slight to severe. It is caused by the face yarns changing the direction of their lay. Footprints and vacuum wheel marks are two types of shading, caused when the yarns are crushed down.

You also sometimes see shading along a seam. One side looks lighter than the other when you enter a room. Then when you walk to the other end of the room and look back, it (more…)