Archive for April, 2014

Common Carpet Defects: Carpet Stop Marks

Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

All kinds of lines appear in carpets. You can see some as soon as the carpet is rolled out; some don’t show up for several days or weeks. Some run lengthwise, others widthwise. Some can be removed, others can’t. Below is information on carpet stop marks. Future blogs will cover other common line flaw types, such as shift marks, oil streaks and pattern bowing. I also suggest you read my previous posts on high lines and low lines in carpet and shear streaks.

Carpet stop marks look like widthwise rows of missing yarn. (more…)

Common Carpet Defects: Carpet Shear Streaks

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

All kinds of lines appear in carpets. You can see some as soon as the carpet is rolled out; some don’t show up for several days or weeks. Some run lengthwise, others widthwise. Some can be removed, others can’t. Below is information on carpet shear streaks. Future blogs will cover other common line flaw types, such as stop marks, shift marks, oil streaks and pattern bowing. I also suggest you read my previous post on high lines and low lines in carpet.

You will see shear streaks when a tufting machine’s shearing blades malfunction. The blades can jump up when the machine stops or starts suddenly. Then you’ll see a (more…)

How to Seam Carpet and Why Carpet Seaming is Important

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

carpet seam sealing | Glenn Revere

Installing carpet correctly is not an easy job. There is more to it than “fuzzy side up”! An installer can spend years learning about the finer points of his (or her) craft. One key point that is frequently skipped completely is carpet seaming. “What is that?” you might ask.

Carpet is a fabric that is cut off a long roll and then cut again as needed to fit a room or rooms. Unless the rooms are slightly smaller than width of the carpet, the pieces must be seamed (joined) together into larger pieces to fit the rooms to be carpeted. (more…)

Common Carpet Defects: High Lines and Low Lines in Carpet

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

All kinds of lines appear in carpets. You can see some as soon as the carpet is rolled out; some don’t show up for several days or weeks. Some run lengthwise, others widthwise. Some can be removed, others can’t. Below is information on high lines and low lines in carpet. Future blogs will cover other common line flaw types, such as shear streaks, stop marks, shift marks, oil streaks and pattern bowing.

Lengthwise high lines or high rows in tufted cut pile carpets show up for a couple of different reasons. Carpets are sheared during the finishing process to produce an even pile height and texture. The shearing blades are like a reel lawn mower that runs the width of the carpet. If the blades are nicked, the carpet pile running under the damaged area comes out higher than the rest of the pile. Improperly set tufting needles can insert a row or rows of yarn that are too long. This happens with both cut and loop patterns. Sometimes the final shearing for cut piles misses these high rows. Loop carpets aren’t sheared, so the high rows stay in the roll until inspection. (more…)

Carpet Problems: All About Carpet Buckling and Wrinkling

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

Carpet buckling occurs when a carpet loses its stretch and wrinkles develop. It can happen because of poor latexing, improper stretching, a soft pad, excess humidity, improper cleaning, or rolling furniture or equipment. Puckers around doorways and wrinkles in the traffic areas are sure signs of buckling.

Poor Latexing

Just as poor latexing leads to weak tuft bind, it can cause a carpet to lose its stretch. Brittle, powdery, or thin latex will make a carpet too flexible and make it impossible to lay tight. If the latex application is not strong enough to bind the primary and secondary backings together, the carpet delaminates. Air gets trapped between the two layers and you’ll see bubbles and buckles. When this happens along a seam, the seam opens up. You can stick your fingers between the two backings. When it happens in the center of the room, the carpet will bunch up when you vacuum. You can easily lift the carpet several inches from the floor. (more…)

Carpet Buying Guide: All About Triexta Carpet

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

The Triexta carpet fiber took almost twenty years to develop specifically as a carpet fiber. While related to polyester, the Federal Trade Commission recognized it as a unique fiber in 2009. Mohawk markets Triexta fiber under their SmartStrand brand.

Triexta fiber has become very popular in the last few years. It is very stain and fade resistant. It cleans well. It is available in a huge range of colors and styles. And it is as resilient as nylon fiber while generally lower priced. It does have an affinity for oily spills. These spills tend to wick and re-appear if they are not carefully cleaned. (more…)

Carpet Buying Guide: All About Polyester Carpet

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

Polyester carpet (PET) has a great “green” story. Most of the polyester used in carpets is made from recycled bottles. In fact, billions of bottles each year are diverted from landfills, melted, and turned into carpet fiber!

Polyester fiber is dyed while still in a melted state. Called solution dyeing, this process puts the color in the molecular structure of the fiber. Solution dyed fibers are extremely colorfast even in strong sunlight. This fiber is very stain resistant to almost all household spills. It also cleans well. Static is non-existent. Generally, polyester carpet costs less than nylon carpet.

Polyester carpet fiber has a few drawbacks. It does not have the same resilience as nylon. Once badly crushed, it will not “bounce back” like nylon. Furniture marks are much more difficult to remove. Polyester carpets must be made in heavier weights to perform as well as nylon carpet. While water based spills come right out, oil based spills are more difficult to remove. Oily spills tend to reappear and could take several re-cleanings to completely remove the spill.

To learn more about carpet fibers, read the following blog post: Carpet Buying Guide: Know the Difference Between Carpet Fibers.

To learn more about carpet buying, carpet care, carpet styles, carpet warranties and more, please subscribe to this blog and check out my book, All About Carpets: Everything You Need to Know.

Who is Glenn Revere?

Glenn Revere has been a carpet expert since 1973. He’s a certified flooring inspector and the author of All About Carpets, the only book written to protect and inform you about your carpet choices, from carpet buying and carpet warranties to carpet care and maintenance. You can find him on Facebook, Google+ and Twitter.

Faded Carpet Color Causes + My Carpet Turned Pink!

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

When you buy a new carpet, you probably select the color carefully. But you probably don’t give much thought about the color fading.

The most obvious reason for color fading is sunlight. Even with special protection on your windows, ultraviolet wavelengths, part of the makeup of daylight, are destructive to all sorts of materials: plastic, paint, rubber, and, yes, the pigments that make the beautiful color in your new carpet. Sometimes the color slowly fades over all the carpet. Sometimes you might see a greenish strip along the base of a sliding door.

Sometimes a carpet’s fading has nothing to do with ultraviolet light. There are other factors that can break down carpet dye and give your carpet a whole new, although unwanted, appearance. These factors include ozone fading and (natural) gas fading.

I recently inspected carpeting in two homes that exhibited the same problem: the carpets were fading from a sand/beige color to pink! (more…)

Carpet Buying Guide: All About Nylon Carpet

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

Chemists have formulated synthetic carpet fibers from petroleum for decades. Some of these synthetics did not work well. Nylon was the first commercially successful synthetic carpet fiber. It wore extremely well.

But earlier generations of nylon fiber also stained badly. Chemists spent years figuring out how to make nylon fiber more stain resistant. Stainmaster brand nylon hit the market in the late ’80’s and changed the carpet industry. Suddenly you could put light colors of carpet in heavily used rooms and maintain it much more easily.

Today, virtually all synthetic fibers are stain resistant. (Note: none of these fibers claims to be stain proof). The trend is towards ultra soft fibers. (more…)