Archive for February, 2014

Carpet Dye Problems: Bleeding and Crocking

Thursday, February 27th, 2014

dyed yarns

Bleeding and crocking are two problems that refer to dye fastness.

Bleeding refers to color loss from a wet carpet, either from cleaning or flooding. It is most common with darker shades, especially reds and blues, because large amounts of dyes are used to achieve the rich colors. Even when rinsed thoroughly at the mill, some excess dye residues can stay in the fabric. When you have your carpet cleaned, the technician (hopefully certified) should detect the condition during pre-cleaning tests. Then the technician will adjust the type of cleaning solution used to stop the bleeding. If the condition seems excessive, tests by the mill can determine if (more…)

What is the Best Time of Year for Carpet Deals?

Tuesday, February 25th, 2014

carpet deals

The best time of year for scoring carpet deals is: early spring or early fall.

The big yearly U.S. wholesale flooring market, called Surfaces, is held at the end of every January in Las Vegas. All the buyers for the flooring stores go there to see the newest styles and the latest fibers. They order their product lines, make special market purchases, and make purchasing commitments for the coming year. Any savings or reductions found at Surfaces are passed along to consumers as major specials.

By early spring, the new carpets have been shipped by the mills and the retailers are ready to “move some rugs.” The housing market begins to move again after the winter doldrums. Springtime is also fix-up time after (more…)

Flooring Inspection Safari: Bubbled and Wrinkled Carpet Backing

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

wrinkled carpet backing | Glenn Revere

Recently, I received an inspection request from a major carpet manufacturer. The complaint involved carpet yarns pulling from the carpet backing.

The carpet was installed throughout a large, well-maintained two-story home. The consumer explained to me that she had found carpet yarns pulled from the backing throughout the installation. She acknowledged that she has a dog and two cats. But she was adamant that her pets had not damaged the carpet.

The carpet texture was a cut and loop pattern. The pattern formed a small grid. When I looked around the rooms, I noticed that (more…)

Carpet Problems: All About Carpet Pile Reversal

Tuesday, February 18th, 2014

As discussed in a recent blog post, carpet shading is an apparent color difference between areas of the same carpet. Shading is seen all over a cut pile carpet. Pile reversal or reverse pile is an extreme form of shading with the pile yarns laying on their sides, causing the carpet to look darker in the affected areas. You see it mostly in high-traffic areas (think hallways) or at pivot points (like doorways). Pile reversal is similar to crushed-velvet furniture fabrics, with light and dark shades.

Some people think shading and pile reversal are ugly because the color is uneven. Others consider it the mark of a fine quality carpet. Oriental rugs often have shading or pile reversal. But the rugs’ ornate patterns tend to make these conditions less noticeable. At any rate, mills will not replace a carpet for pile reversal because they know the replacement will probably reverse, too. (more…)

Carpet Tips: What’s the Best Living Room Carpet?

Thursday, February 13th, 2014

frieze carpet | carpet expert Glenn Revere

Q: What type of carpet is best for high-traffic areas, like living rooms and hallways?

The family room, halls, and steps are the main traffic areas in any home. It makes sense to put the sturdiest carpet and pad in these areas. The investment is well worth it. A heavy frieze, tightly twisted short cut-pile, or Berber will hold up under a lot of traffic. And remember, when a carpet (more…)

Carpet Problems: All About Carpet Shading

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

carpet shading

Carpet shading is an apparent color difference between areas of the same carpet. It is a common complaint with cut pile carpets. The industry considers it a “normal characteristic of cut pile fabrics.” Shading ranges in intensity from slight to severe. It is caused by the face yarns changing the direction of their lay. Footprints and vacuum wheel marks are two types of shading, caused when the yarns are crushed down.

You also sometimes see shading along a seam. One side looks lighter than the other when you enter a room. Then when you walk to the other end of the room and look back, it (more…)

Caring for Wood Floors: How Your Home’s Indoor Environment Affects Wood Flooring

Thursday, February 6th, 2014

wood flooring

When you feel cold inside your home, you turn up the heat. If you have air conditioning, you turn it on when you feel hot. Did you ever think about how the living conditions inside your home affect your wood flooring? Most people don’t, but it is important. Here’s why.

While wood floors are made from”dead” trees, the flooring reacts to temperature and humidity changes inside your home as if it were alive. Your skin reacts to low humidity. So does wood flooring. High humidity and high temperatures affect your skin. These conditions also affect your wood floors. What is comfortable for you is also ideal (more…)

Carpet Problems: The Difference Between Crushing and Matting

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014

Crushing and matting are two common problems that are easy to confuse. Crushing is the flattening down of face yarns through normal use, especially with cut pile carpets. Carpeted traffic areas like hallways typically show crushing. An area directly in front of furniture, such as a chair facing the TV, will crush. When the carpet is vacuumed, the pile should stand up again. It is normal for the tip of the tuft to open. This is called blossoming or blooming.

Matting is more noticeable. It occurs when the tips of cut pile yarns untwist and fray, then get tangled with neighboring tufts. If the tufts untwist one-third of their length or more, and if the affected carpet is widespread and not a confined area subject to unusual usage, the carpet is generally considered defective if it is less than a year old.

Matting and untwisting happen because the heat-set of the yarn is weak. Plied yarns are put through a process that crimps the yarns, twists them, and then (more…)